The Safe Traveler home
 
Safe Traveler Articles

Aloha Airlines Ceases Operation

March 31, 2008
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Standed Passengers May Experience Problems.


The following information was posted on the Aloha Airlines corporate website:

HONOLULU: Aloha Airlines announced today that it will be shutting down its inter-island and transpacific passenger flight operations. Aloha's last day of operations will be Monday, March 31, 2008. On that day, Aloha will operate its schedule with the exception of flights from Hawaii to the West Coast and flights from Orange County to Reno and Sacramento, and Oakland to Las Vegas. Code-share partner United Airlines and other airlines are prepared to assist and accommodate Aloha’s passengers who have been inconvenienced.

For more information on Unite's accommodation options, contact United at 1-800-UNITED1 or www.united.com. Passengers who do not wish to be re-accommodated by another airline should contact their travel agent or credit card company to request a refund. Effective immediately, Aloha will stop selling tickets for travel beyond March 31, 2008.

The shutdown of Aloha's passenger operations will affect about 1,900 employees. Aloha also announced that its air cargo and aviation services units will continue to operate as usual while the U.S. Bankruptcy Court seeks bids from potential buyers. On March 27, 2008, Saltchuk Resources, Inc., announced its intention to buy Aloha's air cargo business.

For compete background and travel information on the United States---Click Here




Tropical Storm Erin Downgraded

August1 6, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Tropical Storm Erin downgraded to tropical depression early Aug. 16. Threat of flooding and Texas flight delays remains.


The National Hurricane Center downgrades Erin to a tropical depression early Aug. 16. The storm is forecast to weaken over the next 12 hours but flooding and wind damage are likely.

Despite the downgrade, flooding is likely. The National Weather Service is predicting that flooding in the Coastal Bend area will be severe. Forecasters predict that rain accumulation of 3 to 6 inches (7 to 18 cm) is likely in the middle Texas coast, with some areas possibly experiencing as much as 8 inches (20 cm). Wind speeds may reach as high as 60 mph (96 kph). Storm surges of 2 to 3 feet (60 to 90 cm) above normal tide levels are possible across the central and southern Texas coast. Tornados are also possible in the middle Texas gulf coast Aug. 16.

Air travelers thoughout Texas may experience flight delays and/or cancellations due to the storm. Travelers are advised to contact their carrier prior to departure to confirm flight status

For compete background and travel information on the United States---Click Here




TSA Lifts Ban on Lighters and Breast Milk

August 6, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

August 4th TSA rule change impacts flyers throughout the United States.

In an effort to concentrate resources on detecting explosive threats, the TSA will no longer ban common lighters in carry-on luggage as of August 4, 2007. The torch style lighters will continue to be banned in carry-on luggage.

According to the Transportation Safety Administration, lifting the lighter ban is consistent with their approach to aviation security. They do not feel lighters pose a significant threat and by freeing security officers from confiscating 22,000 lighters every day (the current number surrendered daily across the country) they can focus more on finding explosives, using behavior recognition, conducting random screening procedures and other measures that increase complexity in the system, deterring terrorists.

The Transportation Safety Administration also adjusted the rules associated with carrying breast milk through security checkpoints. Mothers flying either with or without a child may now carry more than three ounces of breast milk on the plane provided it is declared for inspection at the checkpoint before screening.

For compete background and travel information on the United States---Click Here




Bridge Collapse Update 2 - Minneapolis, Minn.

August 2, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Expect major travel delays in downtown Minneapolis, Minn., following Aug. 1 bridge collapse. Expect sporadic road closures.

Recovery effort continue at the site of the bridge collapse. I-35W is a major artery for travel to and from Minneapolis. Authorities estimate daily traffic across the bridge at 140,000 vehicles. The Cedar Avenue bridge, which runs parallel, is closed. Expect very heavy traffic on all other bridges within at least 1 mile (1.6 km) north and south of the I-35W bridge. The situation is fluid; expect traffic to be redirected frequently. Consider using mass transit for travel in the city. Confirm all meetings and reservations.

Major Detour Information
North of the Bridge Highway 280 will serve as the primary north/south detour route. It has been converted to a temporary freeway with no traffic signals in some areas. It will carry traffic from I-35W in Roseville to Interstate 94.

South of the Bridge All I-35W traffic will diverted to I-94. Expect heavy traffic on I-94.

Resources
The Minnesota Department of Transportation and the City of Minneapolis government are maintaining up-to-date information on traffic changes.
Minnesota Department of Transportation Web Site: www.dot.state.mn.us City of Minneapolis : www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us Real-time Traffic : www.traffic.com/Minneapolis-Traffic/Minneapolis-Traffic-Map.html Hennepin County Medical Center General Information Hotline : 1-612-873-3000

For compete background and travel information on the United States---Click Here




Brazilian Airliner Crash Kills at least 200

July 18, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

TAM Airline crash in Sao Paulo causes major disruptions in service

A Brazilian TAM airliner (flight 3054) crashed on July 17th after landing at Sao Paulo’s Congonhas International Airport. The plane skidded across a highway, hitting a cargo storage building before bursting into flames.

At least 176 passengers and crew plus 25 people on the ground are reported to have died.

In an unrelated incident, a fire at the Rio de Janeiro airport caused a brief shut down.

Travelers to and within Brazil can expect major delays or flight cancellations due to the incidents. Contact your carrier directly for updated flight information.

For up-to-the-minute updates and alerts, where ever you are in the world, sign-up for a Destination Tracker. Updates on the conditions where you are traveling will be forwarded to you immediately.

For compete background and travel information on Brazil---Click Here




Earthquake May Impact Travel In Japan

July 16, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Two Magnitude 6.8 earthquakes strike July 16th in the Sea of Japan off the coast of Niigata

Authorities report at least eight people dead and more than 400 people injured. At least 350 buildings suffered damage from the earthquake including a small electrical fire at the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power plant. Authorities report no radiation leaks.

Officials have suspended some bullet trains and all local trains within the area of the quake. Travelers within the Niigata region may experience some delays and disruptions in rail service

For additional information on Japan---Click Here

For up-to-the-minute updates and alerts, where ever you are in the world, sign-up for a Destination Tracker. Updates on the conditions where you are traveling will be forwarded to you immediately.




Terror Alert Lowered to Severe in Britain

July 4, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Threat of further attacks eases.

It was announced by the U.K. Home Secretary that the government is lowering the terrorism threat level from critical to severe. This indicates that additional attacks are not expected in the immediate future. The reduction also suggests authorities have completed the initial phase of the investigation into the late June attempted attacks in London and Glasgow.

The security measures put in place June 30, when the threat level was raised to critical, will likely be slowly phased out over the coming days and weeks. Expect the tight security measures at airports and along major highways to remain in place. Continue to allow additional time for travel in and through all locations in the U.K.

For further information about the United Kingdom---Click Here

For up-to-the-minute updates and alerts, where ever you are in the world, sign-up for a Destination Tracker. Updates on the conditions where you are traveling will be forwarded to you immediately.




Terror Alert Raised to Critical in Britain

July 2, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Recent terrorist acts in London and Glasgow prompted the official actions .

The recent rash of attempted terrorist attacks in London plus the car bombing at Glasgow's airport in Scotland on Saturday have caused British officials to raise the terror alert level to critical. Travelers can expect heightened security measures, delays in certain areas where security checks are required and closures in some locations. Tourists should remain vigilant and expect delays and disruptions.

To learn more about Scotland---Click Here

For up-to-the-minute updates and alerts, where ever you are in the world, sign-up for a Destination Tracker. Updates on the conditions where you are traveling will be forwarded to you immediately.




US State Department Temporarily Suspends New Passport Requirement

June 7, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

US Citizens who have applied but not received passports will be temporarily allowed to fly to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda due to slow application processing times.

The US State Department and Department of Homeland Security announced a temorary moratorium on the new requirement that US citizens flying to Canada, Bermuda, Mexico or the Caribbean have a valid current passort. Citing heavy demand and a backlog in application processing the temporary suspension applies only to those who have applied but not received their passport

The announcement, posted on the State Department website, reads as follows:

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Departments of State and Homeland Security announced June 7, 2007 that U.S. citizens traveling to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda who have applied for but not yet received passports can nevertheless temporarily enter and depart from the United States by air with a government issued photo identification and Department of State official proof of application for a passport through September 30, 2007. The federal government is making this accommodation for air travel due to longer than expected processing times for passport applications in the face of record-breaking demand.

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) was mandated by Congress in the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 to strengthen border security and facilitate entry into the United States for citizens and legitimate international visitors. WHTI requirements for air travel took effect on January 23, 2007.

Adults who have applied for but not yet received a passport should present government-issued photo identification and an official proof of application from the U.S. Department of State. Children under the age of 16 traveling with their parents or legal guardian will be permitted to travel with the child’s proof of application. Travelers who have not applied for a passport should not expect to be accommodated. U.S. citizens with pending passport applications can obtain proof of application at: http://travel.state.gov.

This accommodation does not affect entry requirements to other countries. Americans traveling to a country that requires passports must still present those documents.

Since implementation, U.S. Customs and Border Protection has and will continue to exercise its current authorities in unique circumstances to allow individuals subject to the WHTI requirements into the United States based on other evidence of identity and citizenship.

As early as January 2008, the departments will begin to implement WHTI at land and sea ports of entry. A Notice of Proposed Rulemaking outlining a phased implementation is expected to be published in the Federal Register within the next two weeks.

Travel document security remains a top priority for the U.S. Government. Both the 9/11 Commission and the U.S. Congress urged strengthening of travel documents to prevent entry of terrorists across our borders, reduce use of fraudulent documents, and speed up entry procedures.




Severe Thunder Storms May Impact Midwest Air Travel

June 7, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Travel delays throughout the system are possible due to late Spring storms

The severe thunderstorms that rolled through several Midwestern states on Wednesday June 6th, may continue on the 7th causing disruptions and flight delays around the nation.

Travelers, even those in other parts of the country are advised to watch local weather reports and contact their carrier to confirm flight information.

For the latest updates and complete details, the Safe Traveler recommends downloading and Intelligence Brief when planning your trip and purchasing a Destination Tracker to have relevant alerts or updates sent to you during your travels.




Tuberculosis Risk to US Airline Passengers

May 29, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Tuberculosis warning issued to passengers on May 12 Air France Flight 385 (Atlanta to Paris) and May 24 Czech Air Flight 104 (Prague to Montreal).

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a statement May 29 that a passenger aboard two flights in early May was infected with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). CDC officials believe the man was not highly infectious when he traveled, but people seated close to him on the flight may have been exposed to the disease.

The passenger was on the following flights:

Air France Flight 385 from Atlanta, U.S., to Paris, France, on May 12 Czech Air Flight 104 from Prague, Czech Republic, to Montreal, Canada, on May 24. CDC officials are recommending that the cabin crews on both flights and passengers seated in the same row as the patient, or up to two rows in front of or behind him, seek medical evaluation.

The passenger is hospitalized in respiratory isolation and is undergoing treatment.

For the latest updates and complete details, the Safe Traveler recommends downloading and Intelligence Brief when planning your trip and purchasing a Destination Tracker to have relevant alerts or updates sent to you during your travels.




Mumps Outbreak Spreads in Canada

May 15, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Reports of Cases Spreads from Nova Scotia to Ontario

Canadian authorities reported that an outbreak of mumps, which began in Nova Scotia, has spread to several areas in Ontario, including Ottawa, York and Waterloo.

Authorities have confirmed 222 cases in all nine of Nova Scotia's districts since late February. The majority of cases are located in and around Halifax; additional clusters have been reported from the areas of Lunenburg, Queens, Shelburne, Yarmouth and Digby. Among the persons infected are many students from Dalhousie University in Halifax.

As university students have completed classes and returned home, the disease has spread. Doctors are reporting 40 cases in New Brunswick and are investigating nine on Prince Edward Island.

For the latest updates and complete details, the Safe Traveler recommends downloading and Intelligence Brief when planning your trip and purchasing a Destination Tracker to have relevant alerts or updates sent to you during your travels.




Cruise Ship Grounded off Alaskan Coast

May 14, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Incident Highlights Need for Travel Safety Even on Cruises

The Empress of the North cruise ship was grounded May 14th off the coast of Juneau, Alaska. The ship, which is owned by the Majestic American Line was eventually able to resume travels but most of the passengers (approximately 200) were evacuated by the US Coast Guard and volunteer vessels as a safety precaution.

For the latest updates and complete details, the Safe Traveler recommends downloading and Intelligence Brief when planning your trip and purchasing a Destination Tracker to have relevant alerts or updates sent to you during your travels.




Italian Transportation Strikes Will Impact Travel in May

May 9, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Air, rail, ferry and mass transit workers plan strikes.

As required by Italian law, unions in that country have announced strikes against the transportation sector throughout the month of May. The scheduled strikes include ferry workers (May 12 and 14), flight attendants (May 14 and 21), air traffic controllers (May 14) and railway workers (May 17-18). Strikes are also scheduled for mass transit workers in various cities. The work stoppages will generally be contained to specific cities or regions but ones like the flight attendants strike on May 21 will impact domestic and international strikes throughout the country.

It is not uncommon for unions to cancel strikes at the last moment but travelers to Italy or those making connections through the country are advised to monitor the situation closely to avoid disruptions.

For the latest updates and complete details, the Safe Traveler recommends downloading and Intelligence Brief when planning your trip and purchasing a Destination Tracker to have relevant alerts or updates sent to you during your travels.




Security Forces and Workers Clash in Beijing

May 4, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Incident Showcases Growing Labor Unrest as China Prepares for the Olympics

Late Thursday, May 3rd, security forces and migrant workers clashed at the construction site for the Olympic Stadium in Beijing. According to reports the confrontation started when the privately hired security guards confronted a group of workers who were smoking in a non-smoking area.

The situation escalated when as many as 10 guards began scuffling with the workers who were joined by others who rushed to their defense. The clash resulted in at least three injures - one serious. It remains unclear whether authorities plan to prosecute any of those involved.

Clashes and altercations between security personnel and protesters is a growing problem in China. Although the incident was likely spurred by a general antagonism against migrant workers in large cities, it also raises the issue of workplace conditions across China, an issue that has triggered numerous protests in recent years. Fallout from the incident is not likely to delay the construction of the stadium for the 2008 Olympic Games. Travelers throughout China should be alert to possible labor unrest.




Algerian Bombings Remind of the Risk from Terrorism

April 11, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

The April 11th bombings in Algiers remind all travelers of the need to minimize the dangers and risks of traveling, especially in certain parts of the world.

At least 17 people were killed and more than 80 injured when a powerful car bomb exploded just before 11:00 a.m. local time in downtown Algiers. The bomb appears most likely to be the work of Al-Qaeda in Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), a terrorist organization operating within the country of Algeria.

The bombing occurred in an area of the city where a number if government ministries are located and appears to have targeted the offices of the prime minister and the interior minister.

Shortly after the blast the police station near Houari Boumedienne Airport was rocked by a second bombing.

The April 11th bombings remind everyone that the threat of terrorism remains real. They also point to the need for travelers, regardless of their destination, to remain vigilant to minimize their risk. It is important to note that while terrorist acts can happen anywhere, there are areas around the world that are higher risk. Travelers, especially to higher risk areas need to take precautions.

Here are a few key safety tips that may help protect you from terrorist attack when traveling:

Always preplan your trip. Learn as much as you can about current conditions in your destination. The Safe Traveler Intelligence Brief is an excellent source.

Discuss the details of your trip with colleagues and family members. Make certain they are aware of your itinerary. If something changes, make sure to notify them. Register with your consulate or embassy.

When in country, try to minimize your exposure and identity as a foreigner. Even the way you dress can mark you as an obvious visitor. Don’t mark you luggage with things that identify you as a foreigner. Avoid areas where foreigners congregate and common areas which are exposed. Use only authorized transportation. Try to pre-arrange travel from the airport to the hotel but be prepared to make alternative arrangements if conditions warrant.

Be friendly but cautious when speaking with locals, particularly strangers. Avoid giving out personal details or information about your trip. Be aware of your surroundings and areas of safety such as police stations. Be alert and as inconspicuous as possible.

If you do notice something odd, such as someone following you, report it immediately to the authorities. Never accept packages from strangers and never meet strangers in unfamiliar or isolated locations. Stay aware of changing conditions and situations while visiting the country. The Destination Tracker from The Safe Traveler is a good resource for this as any relevant updates or alerts will be immediately forwarded to you while you are in the country.



Increased Flight Cancellations Possible

March 21, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

The recent round of winter storms and the resulting criticism the airlines have received over their handling of the delays may lead to an increase in pre-emptive cancellations. The airlines are dealing with system limitations and financial pressures to find a balance between delays and cancellations.

Travelers should be mindful that even though the worst of the winter season may be over, forecasts of inclement spring and summer weather may trigger pre-emptive cancellations of flights.

Flight delays and cancellations can have system-wide implications if hub airports are impacted. Travelers are advised to check with their carrier for updates, monitor weather outlets and check with The Safe Traveler when traveling to minimize the potential impact on their travel plans.

According to the Bureau of Transportation statistics, 22.6% of all flights experienced a delay in 2006. Cancellations were 1.7% of all flights. Those numbers increased in January of this year to 24.2% delayed and 2.53% cancelled entirely. 

Cell Phone Ban on U.S. Flights to Continue According to the FCC

April 4, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

The Federal Communications Commission announced in a press release issued April 3rd that they would terminate consideration on lifting the ban on the use of cellular phones during flights. This means the ban on use during flights will continue for the foreseeable future.

The FCC, which along with the FAA regulates the use of electronic devises on airlines had adopted a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in December 2004 to examine the existing rule that requires cellular phones to be turned off once an aircraft leaves the ground. This requirement is in place in order to avoid interfering with cellular network systems on the ground.

According to the press release, “The comments filed in response to the NPRM provide insufficient technical information on whether the use of cellular phones onboard aircraft may cause harmful interference to terrestrial networks. Further, because airlines, manufacturers, and wireless providers are still researching the use of cell phones and other PEDs onboard aircraft, the FCC found that it would be premature to seek further comment at this juncture.”

The agency did leave the door open to future re-considerations if new technical considerations warrant.

Increased Flight Cancellations Possible

March 21, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

The recent round of winter storms and the resulting criticism the airlines have received over their handling of the delays may lead to an increase in pre-emptive cancellations. The airlines are dealing with system limitations and financial pressures to find a balance between delays and cancellations.

Travelers should be mindful that even though the worst of the winter season may be over, forecasts of inclement spring and summer weather may trigger pre-emptive cancellations of flights.

Flight delays and cancellations can have system-wide implications if hub airports are impacted. Travelers are advised to check with their carrier for updates, monitor weather outlets and check with The Safe Traveler when traveling to minimize the potential impact on their travel plans.

According to the Bureau of Transportation statistics, 22.6% of all flights experienced a delay in 2006. Cancellations were 1.7% of all flights. Those numbers increased in January of this year to 24.2% delayed and 2.53% cancelled entirely. 

Airport Delays May Increase Risk of Crime

March 5, 2007
by Staff Writer, The Safe Traveler

Despite the relative safety of airports, travelers experiencing delays can unfortunately find themselves dealing with the fact they are victims of crime.

The confusion, fatigue and desperation caused by airport delays, particularly extended delays, can create an opportunity for criminals to prey on stranded passengers. Harried passengers may let their normal defenses lapse, increasing their vulnerability to petty crimes such as pickpocketing. Credit card thieves may find the confusion provides an advantage as travelers reserve hotels, cars, etc. over the telephone. Unscrupulous drivers and hotel operators may price gouge.

And it's not just "professional" criminals that can cause problems. A bag left unattended or with valuables exposed can create a tempting "crime of opportunity." Without proper precautions, victims of delays can easily become victims of crime.

Avoid Becoming a Victim
Fortunately the same common-sense steps you should take when normally traveling can help protect you from crime during a delay. The challenge is not letting the frustrations or fatigue caused by the delay lower your defenses. Here are a few tips that can help keep you from becoming a victim of crime.

1. Don't assume that because you are in an airport you are safe from petty crime. The steps taken to ensure safe air travel can help ensure your overall safety but they are not focused on preventing petty crime such as pickpocketing or credit card theft.

2. Minimize the valuables you bring when traveling. Do you really need all the gadgets? The fewer you bring, the lighter your travel and the fewer opportunities for problems.

3. Protect your personal property. Keep bags, purses and wallets closed and with you at all times. If you're tired and need to nap, try using the bag as a pillow or keep your arm around it.

4. When using the restroom, keep bags and luggage in your line-of-sight.

5. If you're shopping or eating in a food court, avoid leaving items unattended, even to get-up and throw something away. If you must, keep the item in your line-of-sight.

6. If leaving the airport always use authorized transportation. If possible confirm rates prior to leaving.

7. Never leave personal items with others if you're going outside. While it may be a hassle to go back through the security screening, don't ask a stranger (even if they're from your same hometown or traveling to the same destination) to watch your bag.

8. If possible, store your items in an airport rental locker.

9. Use care when entering credit card information over a phone. Don't flash the card. Cover your hands if entering the numbers on the key pad or speak quietly if reading them aloud.

10. Keep your items in view when passing through security screening.

11. Try to use well-known hotels and confirm rates. Supply and demand may be factors in pricing (as well as making last minute reservations) but you should not expect to pay exorbitant rates just because you are stuck in a city due to a storm.

Remember that most security in airports is designed to keep you safe when flying.  Use common sense when traveling and don't let your guard down just because you're in a terminal. 

 
Transportation Security Adminstration (TSA) to Test Voluntary Full Body Scan in Phoenix
To Read More Click Here



New Passport Requirements Have Some Travelers Confused and Others Scrambling.
To Read More Click Here

media kitaboutpressadvertiseblogs
Archive
Page: <<    >>
 
RSS Feed

 
Trackbacks
Posted on 11/6/2007 4:49:36 PM | By Anonymous

Posted on 4/17/2007 2:42:32 PM | By b_i4@hotmail.com

Posted on 4/17/2007 2:27:18 PM | By Anonymous

Posted on 4/13/2007 3:18:26 PM | By b_i4@hotmail.com

Posted on 4/12/2007 5:39:55 PM | By b_i4@hotmail.com

Posted on 4/12/2007 5:39:12 PM | By b_i4@hotmail.com

URL:  
 
Comments (10)
By: Anonymous
Posted on 4/27/2008 3:56:24 AM
http://nissov.net http://bmw-12.nissov.net http://cadillac-5.nissov.net http://chevrolet-15.nissov.net http://bmw-9.nissov.net http://cadillac-2.nissov.net http://chrysler-4.nissov.net http://chevrolet-3.nissov.net http://bmw-18.nissov.net http://chevrolet-12.nissov.net http://bmw-2.nissov.net http://bmw-19.nissov.net http://bmw-15.nissov.net http://nissov.net http://audi-2.nissov.net http://bmw-1.nissov.net http://chevrolet-17.nissov.net http://cadillac-4.nissov.net http://chevrolet-8.nissov.net http://chevrolet-4.nissov.net
 
By: budiawan82@gmail.com
Posted on 10/9/2007 11:45:16 AM
test
 
By: budiawan82@gmail.com
Posted on 10/9/2007 11:44:46 AM
abc
 
By: budiawan82@gmail.com
Posted on 10/9/2007 11:42:57 AM
Very interesting
 
By: b_i4@hotmail.com
Posted on 6/22/2007 9:18:20 PM
nice article
 
By: b_i4@hotmail.com
Posted on 4/17/2007 2:43:02 PM
Phil Fung, the tech lead for network pages, is mildly disturbed by how many people like the movie "Dirty Dancing" in the London network.
 
By: b_i4@hotmail.com
Posted on 4/17/2007 2:42:47 PM
your network (in addition to stats about popular movies, political views, etc.). Hot.
 
By: Anonymous
Posted on 4/12/2007 6:30:21 PM
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) — Sony Computer Entertainment America said Thursday it will discontinue its lower-capacity PlayStation 3 in North America, noting it has been outsold by the higher-capacity model. The 60-gigabyte model, which has three times more storage capacity as the 20-gigabyte model, caters to gamers who also use the device to watch video and movies.
 
By: Anonymous
Posted on 4/12/2007 6:20:10 PM
Test Comments
 
By: b_i4@hotmail.com
Posted on 4/12/2007 6:19:12 PM
He said there is a limited inventory of the 20-gigabyte units in stores. The retail price of those machines will remain at $500 until supplies are sold out.
 

Leave a Comment:

 

 
Your Cart Has 0 Items: $0.00